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Butterflies of Thailand, Malaysia & Borneo
Common Lascar
Pantoporia hordonia
Family - NYMPHALIDAE
subfamily - LIMENITIDINAE
Tribe - NEPTINI
Pantoporia hordonia, Taman Negara, West Malaysia  Adrian Hoskins
Introduction
The Lascars are similar in pattern and wing shape to the Neptis Sailors, but the stripes and bands on the upperside wings are orange instead of white.
There are about 15-18 species in the genus Pantoporia, of which 5 are found in West Malaysia, the remainder being found in various other parts of the Oriental region, or on Papua New Guinea and surrounding areas.
Pantoporia hordonia is by far the commonest and most widespread member of the genus, being found from India and Sri Lanka to south China, Taiwan and the Philippines; and south through the Malay archipelago to Java and Lombok.
Habitats
This butterfly is found in disturbed areas of primary rainforest, including in small clearings; and along forested riverbanks at elevations between sea level and about 300 metres.
Lifecycle
The egg is pale green and covered in a network of hexagonal ridges from which arise numerous very short spikes. It is laid singly on the underside of leaves of the foodplants.
The caterpillar is pale olive green, with a large straw-coloured 'saddle' which tapers towards the anal segment, and extends to below the spiracles along the first 4 abdominal segments. Along the sides, within the saddle area are 4 diagonal dark olive stripes. The head is smooth, and olive in colour. The caterpillar feeds on withered leaves of Acacia, Albizia, Abarema, Pithecellobium and possibly other Mimosaceae.
The chrysalis is pale brown with blackish markings, dark green wing cases, and a group of white circular spots on the thorax. It is suspended by the cremaster from a leaf or twig.
Adult behaviour
The adults have a sailing flight similar to that of Neptis, but not as graceful. They are usually seen singly, most often along narrow trails or small glades in heavily forested areas.
I have not observed males mud-puddling, or seen either sex nectar at flowers, but have often seen them basking among leaf litter in places where dappled sunlight reaches the forest floor.
 

 

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